Survive—The Economic Collapse


By Piero San Giorgio

Translated by F. Roger Devlin

For millions of people, the ongoing economic crisis has marked the End of the World As We Know It. The "American Dream" (and ones like it) of a guaranteed job, a home, and a pension, has given way to the nightmare of unemployment, unpayable debt, depression, and uncertainty. In Survive The Economic Collapse, Piero San Giorgio looks behind the headlines and sound bites and demonstrates that today's economic crisis is no temporary "downturn," nor is it simply the result of bad policies. The crisis is the beginning of the end of a global paradigm when expectations of endless economic growth and progress crash up against the reality of scarcity and limited resources. The implications of the collapse cannot be ignored: a steep decline in living standards due to the evaporation of easy credit; a new political landscape that might inspire nationalism, geopolitical reshuffling, and even wars over resources; and, potentially, a reduction in global population. No mere doom-sayer, San Giorgio explains not just how to understand the crisis but overcome it how to foster a resilient community, stay healthy, and become self-sufficient and productive in the "interesting times" that lie ahead. Packed with tactical information and resources, Survive is nothing less than a field manual for the apocalypse. 

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PIERO SAN GIORGIO is a Swiss author and former businessman and software executive. For the past decade, Giorgio has studied the global economic system and its dependence on ever-expanding populations, debt, and resource exploitation.

I concur with Piero San Giorgio that there is much we can do besides hand-wringing, prayer, and needless political conflict to facilitate the transition into the next era of human history. I think we also agree on the nature of that journey s destination: a reset, shall we say, to far less complex living arrangements in a world that has grown wider, with fewer people, smaller sovereign units of governance, and reconstructed local economies. The to do list of crucial tasks for civilized people can be stated succinctly: we have to grow our food differently as industrial farming goes obsolete; we have to inhabit the landscape in ways other than suburbia and colossal metroplex cities; we have to move people and things in ways other than airplanes and automobiles; and we have to rebuild the fine-grained, local networks of economic interdependence that will constitutae commerce as we leave the economic dinosaurs of Walmart (and things like it) behind. In this agenda there is no room for crybabies, scapegoating, or pettifogging. Piero San Giorgio lays all this out here with a most refreshing clarity of purpose, which I commend to you as a valuable cram course in how to survive the rest of your life.


Radix / Washington Summit Publishers