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CONQUEST OF A CONTINENT

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BY MADISON GRANT

NEW FOREWORD BY RICHARD B. SPENCER

Madison Grant was once one the United States' leading conservationists. His preoccupation with biodiversity, however, was not circumscribed to wildlife, but extended to humans, particularly where human biodiversity intersected with the wider sweep of history, its meaning and interpretation , and government policy. 

In his ambitious second and final book, Grant provides a racial history of the European settlement of North America, spanning from the ancient nations of Europe to the demographics of the United States of his day.

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Additional Info


PUBLISHER
The Palingenesis Project

YEAR
2013 [New Edition]

PAGES
436

Binding
Cloth

ISBN
 
978-1-909606-01-2


SYNOPSIS

Madison Grant was once 0ne the United States' leading conservationists. His preoccupation with biodiversity, however, was not circumscribed to wildlife, but extended to humans, particularly where human biodiversity intersected with the wider sweep of history, its meaning and interpretation , and government policy. 

In his ambitious second and final book, Grant provides a racial history of the European settlement of North America, spanning from the ancient nations of Europe to the demographics of the United States of his day. His thesis, demonstrated here, was that the United States was settled mostly by peoples of Northwestern European descent, particularly English and Ulster Scot; to his mind, this relative homogeneity, plus the generally high quality of these enterprising settlers, conferred upon the new nation its unique cultural characteristics, prosperity, cohesion, and stability. He was concerned that recent waves of immigration from poorer parts of Europe, wherefrom came less desirable immigrants, would not make the United States more vibrant, but rather lead to social instability, division, economic decline, and a growing underclass. He was also concerned that the failure to deal with the problems left by slavery stored trouble for the future. 

Grant's represents today an unfashionable opinion, and his framework of analysis—not to mention his Nordicist bias—makes him seem outdated, even among those who would otherwise sympathise with his arguments. Yet, in his day, Grant represented a legitimate strand of opinion, which enjoyed support with much of the old WASP establishment, up to and including the highest levels of academia, politics, and the scientific community. What is more, nearly half a century since the restrictive immigration legislation that Grant campaigned for was overturned, and eighty years since the book was written, the old arguments have not gone away: with inspiration from 21st-century identitarian movements in Europe, they are being recast and revisited in the United States in light of the fact that the country is more socially unstable, more divided, less prosperous, and with a much greater underclass than before, despite strenuous efforts made by of Grant's opponents over the past century to prove him wrong. Worse still, the founding stock of the United States is in steep decline, a process that has already transformed the country in ways anticipated by Grant. 

This edition has been meticulously annotated, making it a resource for casual readers and scholars alike. It also comes with all the original maps, an expanded index, a foreword by Richard Spencer of the National Policy Institute, and cover artwork by Alex Kurtagic. It is, above all, a beautiful, high-quality, collectible modern edition.