Un-Happy

Culture is said to be a reflection of contemporary social moods – but if that is true, then we must be living in extraordinarily happy times based on our popular music.

While I’m predisposed to agree with the assertion that culture does reflect societal tensions, the music of our time does not even come close to that goal. The likely culprit of that is a top-down, commercialization of music that largely determines what new music an individual would come in contact with while out in public or listening to the radio.

For young people who are the primary consumers of pop music, the times aren’t so rosy and there’s serious long-term issues that lie ahead for this beleaguered generation. As if in reaction to this development, the music that is now pumped out on the radio is syrupy, saccharine and happy to the point of obnoxiousness.

And the number one offender of this trend is Pharrell Williams’ song “Happy.” With an incredibly creative title, the song resembles a children’s nursery rhyme with a torturously, repetitive chorus and lyrics that have all the depth of a kiddy pool. Mr. Pharrell has managed to transform the spirit of “emotional pornography” into audio form, complete with a negro musical sheen.

Take a look at the lyrics and marvel at the drivel that is spewed forth by our craftsmen of culture:

[Verse 1:] It might seem crazy what I’m about to say Sunshine she’s here, you can take a break I’m a hot air balloon that could go to space With the air, like I don’t care baby by the way

[Chorus:] Because I’m happy Clap along if you feel like a room without a roof Because I’m happy Clap along if you feel like happiness is the truth Because I’m happy Clap along if you know what happiness is to you Because I’m happy Clap along if you feel like that’s what you wanna do

[Verse 2:] Here come bad news talking this and that, yeah, Well, give me all you got, and don’t hold it back, yeah, Well, I should probably warn you I’ll be just fine, yeah, No offense to you, don’t waste your time Here’s why

[Chorus]

Hey, come on

[Bridge:] (happy) Bring me down Can't nothing bring me down My level's too high Bring me down Can't nothing bring me down I said (let me tell you now) Bring me down Can't nothing bring me down My level's too high Bring me down Can't nothing bring me down I said

[Chorus 2x]

Hey, come on

(happy) Bring me down… can’t nothing… Bring me down… my level's too high… Bring me down… can’t nothing… Bring me down, I said (let me tell you now)

[Chorus 2x]

Come on

It’s quite obvious that this song, which was originally made for the children’s film “Despicable Me 2,” has taken on a life of its own and is reflecting much of the feeling that pop music is now trying to convey.

It’s an elixir for the woes that face Millennials face today. Feeling frightened that you can’t a decent job? Clap your hands and be happy instead! Girlfriend left you to hop aboard the cock carousel? Clap your hands and be happy instead! Feeling like you should blow your brains out because you have no purpose in life? Clap your hands and be happy instead!

At least the music video accurately depicts the real people of America with average, fat schlubs dancing in the street to the song to let you know it’s ok to be a hapless loser in life’s game.

In real life, the tell-tale signs of mass unhappiness are on display. Depression, drug abuse, and suicide rates are all rising and the infamous Misery Index is not looking good at the moment.

This song, along with the growing proliferation of “emotional porn,” misdirects people’s frustrations with their lives and society to gooey, feel-good messages. Don’t worry about problems, just watch this video or read this blurb about happiness and magically become satisfied with life. It’s the soft power of totalitarian humanism that mandates cheery thoughts -- even though the world around you is going to hell.

Unhappiness with the world is the root cause of revolution, which is why we have garbage like “Happy” blaring at us like the minutes of hate from Orwell’s 1984. But in my opinion, these opiates won’t last long and eventually enough whites will wake up to try to change the world.

Then we can truly be happy.