Where Are They Now?

YWC has published a hilarious catalog of some modern American icons: 


Rodney King, the Jena 6, and the Duke Lacrosse stripper
By William Houston

One of my favorite hobbies for several years now has been keeping track of former "civil rights" celebrities after their fifteen minutes of undeserved media fame are over. It is an excellent way to demonstrate how political correctness has corrupted American journalism.

Everyone in America has at least a passing familiarity with these victims of White "racism," but few are familiar with their trials since then, which the mainstream media has refused to give the same amount of inordinate attention.

Where are these martyrs for "social justice" now?

Rodney King

Rodney King is my personal favorite: in the years since the Los Angeles riots, which led to the death of 55 people, King has been arrested for soliciting and having sex with a transvestite prostitute in Hollywood, beating his wife, multiple DUIs, vandalism, beating his own child, and indecent exposure in a public park while being high on PCP.

In 2003, King drove his car into a house after weaving through traffic and traveling at a speed over 100 mph. Two years later, he was arrested after threatening to kill his daughter and former girlfriend.

Don Lemon recently glamorized Rodney King in a CNN Presents special report called "Race and Rage: The Beating of Rodney King" to commemorate the twentieth anniversary of the alleged "racist beating" of this scumbag.

King won a cool $3.8 million dollar settlement in his civil suit. He used the money to start a hip hop record label.

A month ago, Rodney King was stopped by the LAPD for erratic driving and was issued a citation for driving with an expired license. Twenty years later, Rodney King is still a threat to public safety.

Jena 6

The Jena 6 were six black students in Jena, Louisiana who in an unprovoked assault beat a White student named Justin Barker nearly to death in 2006. Al Sharpton marched on Jena with 15,000 to 20,000 supporters to protest the clear injustice that was done to Barker's black attackers.

The Jena 6 movement was hailed in the mainstream media at the time as "the first struggle of the 21st century Civil Rights Movement."

In 2007, Jesse Ray Beard was accused, convicted and sentenced for simple battery, simple criminal damage to property less than $500 and simple assault.

In 2008, Bryant Purvis was arrested for assaulting a fellow high school student in Texas.

Corwin Jones was arrested for trespassing and simple battery following an incident in which he struck a man from behind.

Also in 2008, Mychal Bell spat in the face of his female attorney and pushed her to the ground. He was arrested later that year for shoplifting, resisting arrest, and simple assault after trying to steal $700 worth of clothes from a Dillard's department store.

In 2010, Bell was arrested and charged with battery after punching someone who was "running his mouth" at a Jena barber shop.

Catrina Wallace, the sister of Robert Bailey, founder of "Organizing in the Trenches," and central organizer of the Jena 6 protests, was arrested in "Operation Third Option" in 2009 and was recently convicted on three counts of distribution of a controlled substance. She faces decades in prison.

Marcus Jones, father of Mychal Bell, is calling for a Justice Department investigation into the arrest and conviction of Ms. Wallace.

Duke Lacrosse Stripper

In 2006, a black stripper named Crystal Magnum falsely accused three Duke lacrosse players, all of whom were White, of raping her at a party. Like the Jena 6, the Duke lacrosse scandal ignited a media firestorm about White racism and brought out all the usual suspects.

Hysteria swept Duke University.

The accused players were suspended, the team's coach was fired, and the entire lacrosse season was cancelled. The case later fell apart after it became obvious that Magnum had fabricated her story.

This morning Crystal Magnum was arrested and charged with assault with a deadly weapon after attempting to kill her boyfriend with a kitchen knife. The officers who arrived on the scene found that Magnum had succeeded in stabbing him in the torso.

In December, jurors found Magnum guilty of three counts of contributing to the abuse and neglect of minors (her own children who were taken away by social services), resisting arrest, and $500 worth of property damage. She had set fire to the clothes of her then boyfriend in a bathtub.


I suggest we play a game: share the facts above on various websites and see how long it takes to get banned, down voted, or accused of "racism."

I'm about to try this out myself. We can compare scores in the comments.