Extreme Left vs. Greece


On January 23rd, 237 illegal immigrants, escorted by extreme leftists, boarded on a ship from Chania, Crete to Piraeus and from there they traveled to Athens city center where they occupied the building of the Athens University Law School.

Their demand was that of amnesty for all illegal immigrants living currently in Greece. Such a demand—if met—would have contravened the European Pact on Immigration and Asylum but, more importantly, would have been a suicidal own-goal. It would apply to hundreds of thousands of people (moderate estimates talk of 470,000 but illegal immigrants in Greece may well be twice as many, or even more) and it would once again send a signal to all countries in the world that Greece still is ‘soft touch’ on immigration and that if someone, somehow, makes it in the country and stays in long enough, he/she will be legalized sooner or later.

The incident also raises the question why people of the Left are willing to support people who are in the country illegally and organize such stunts which promote demands which are against the rule of law and against the country’s interests. The reply to this has two strands: the first is ideological and the second is political. The people who organized and supported the occupation of the Law School building, be they members of parliamentary parties or not (some of them were, some others were not), are ideologically fixated to a neo-communist worldview. Not only do they not support the Constitution and parliamentary democracy but their actual aim is to overthrow it and to turn Greece into a socialist “people’s republic” (of the Cuban or Venezuelan sort). Their extremism is more apparent now as their moderate comrades, not agreeing with such extremist views, have left them and formed a new socialdemocratic party. Moreover, these people have a perverse view of cosmopolitanism which results in a total rejection of all things Greek (be it the Greek nation, its history, its culture etc). That’s why they unreservedly support a maximalistic view of multiculturalism and want to impose it on the country’s unwilling population.

The neo-communists’ plans have not found much electoral support among Greeks. And that’s where the political strand comes in. For them the immigrants (especially the illegal ones) represent the new proletariat which will act as a battering ram in bringing down the regime of parliamentary democracy. By supporting the large and continuous influx of illegal immigrants (and their ex-post facto legalization) they shatter Greece’s homogeneity and they erode its national identity and social capital. That way they slowly but steadily destroy the pillars which support the Hellenic Republic. Moreover, out of the hundreds of thousands of illegal immigrants they can gain new recruits who will swell their ranks, new voters (ex-post facto legalized immigrants had the right to vote in the recent local elections) and even new foot-soldiers for when they decide it is time to plunge the country into anarchy and make their final push in order to storm the Winter Palace…

Everyone is entitled to have midsummer night dreams – but not at the expense of the rest of society. What is even sadder is the fact that multiculturalism in any shape or form has turned out to be an utter failure all over Europe. The more pluralist approaches of the UK and the Netherlands have failed in the same way the civic approach has failed in France and the ethnocentric approach has failed in Germany. For example, the riots and the ethnic clashes in the towns of the English North in the Summer of 2001, the suicide bombings of July 2005 by British Muslims in London, the continuous failed terrorist attempts, the signs of disenchantment towards immigrants by the native population, the increasing radicalization of British Muslim youth, etc. are signs of the irreparable failure of multiculturalism in the UK. Similar lists could be made for all aforementioned countries.

Unfortunately, these lessons have not sunk-in in the heads of Greek neo-communists. It seems that what the rest of Europe has realized it has turned out to be a big problem, the neo-communists still consider it as a good solution and as a necessary means for the creation of their socialist utopia!

PS: On February 4th the Minister for Education Ms Anna Diamandopoulou speaking in Parliament on the Law School incident, said that, in her opinion, the occupation was part of a plan organized by left-wing groups which aimed to cause bloodshed in Athens that evening or the following days. Quod Erat Demonstrandum.